What Is The Best Way To Cope With Pain?

Pain is defined as being an experience of both physiological and psychological discomforts marked by unpleasant or uncomfortable sensory symptoms resulting from some sort of damage or injury (Gurung, 2014). The origin of pain can come from a variety of sources and there are numerous ways that individuals can cope with pain, consisting of either psychological or biological interventions. Certain pain management therapies may work better than others depending on the source and duration of pain, as well as an individual’s tolerance and threshold for the pain. According to Gurung (2014), there are three primary classifications of effectively managing pain: physiological treatment, psychological treatment, and self-management techniques.

Physiological techniques for managing pain, for instance, often involve the use of pharmacological or chemical management methods, traditional or holistic treatments (e.g. acupuncture), and surgical interventions. Medicinal therapies are generally one of the first approaches used for pain management, particularly if the ailment is caused by acute pain triggers (e.g. broken bones, sprains, illnesses, etc.), and generally comprise of pharmaceuticals called nonopioid, opioids, and adjuvants. Adjuvants are medications that are prescribed to manage pain but are not solely listed for that purpose. These medications are used primarily because they have shown some effect in helping to manage pain, although they may elicit different physiological responses. Some common example of adjuvants includes benzodiazepines, corticosteroids, antidepressants, and local anesthetics (Gurung, 2014). Nonopioids, on the other hand, include many of the over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen, aspirin, or acetaminophen. According to Gurung (2014), “these medications act locally, often at the site of pain” (p. 291) and provide quick-acting, short-term relief in milder forms of acute pain. However, nonopioid drugs are generally not recommended for continued use due to the many long-term side effects associated with these drugs and their inability to maintain pain relief over time.

A stronger category of medication, known as opioids or narcotics, are much better suited for more severe pain management, particularly for those undergoing a surgical procedure, have suffered a severe illness or injury, or are living with a chronic or debilitating illness. Some well-known examples of opioids include oxycodone, codeine, morphine, and methadone. Opioids are the drug of choice for moderate to severe pain, given their level of effectiveness. Morphine, for example, works by binding to the “receptors in the periaqueductal gray area of the midbrain and produces pronounced analgesia and pleasant moods” and mimics the body’s natural response to coping with pain (Gurung, 2014, p. 291). However, opioids come with their own set of side-effects that are often much more severe than nonopioid medications. For instance, there is a much higher risk factor for overdose or addiction, and individuals who take opioids for chronic pain management often build up a large tolerance to these types of medications. Therefore, in order to gain the same benefit, patients also need to increase the dosage of the drug which places them even further at risk for the potential of overdose or addiction. Nonetheless, the controversy over the effects of long-term opioid use is a hot topic of debate in both the medical and chronic illness communities.

Still, there are a number of physiological techniques, outside of medications, that also assist with pain management strategies. Some examples include acupuncture, surgical interventions, and the use of either hot and cold compresses (and even alternating the two). Acupuncture, for example, works to manage pain by releasing blocked energy associated to pain and has been used in Traditional Chinse Medicine for years (Gurung, 2014). Alternately, surgical treatments can also help in decreasing levels of pain by removing the conduction of many of nerve fibers throughout the body that directly or indirectly transmit pain signals to the brain. However, while surgical approaches typically provide relief of pain for a period of time, improvement does not seem to provide a long-term cure since nerve fibers’ have the ability to regenerate. Still, while the majority physiological techniques offer relatively good methods in managing acute forms of pain, psychological strategies for the management of pain are likely to be more effective for handling chronic forms of pain.

Research into various psychological techniques shows that many of the pain pathways found within the human body are directly linked to the brain, ensuring that pain is very much a psychological process in addition to being a physiological one as well. A person’s mood can greatly impact how individual’s cope with or experience pain and altering one’s cognitions about chronic pain is, therefore, detrimental to obtaining control of individual levels of pain. For instance, when a person is undergoing chronic stress or is depressed, they are likely to feel more pain. According to Gurung (2014), “negative mood states can lead to biased forms of thinking. These cognitive biases can accentuate the feelings of pain and need to be modified” (p. 294).  Often, these behavioral modifications come from the use of psychological techniques (e.g. hypnosis, distraction methods, and relaxation techniques) in a similar manner to the practices associated with coping skills for dealing with stress. Distraction techniques, for example, are helpful in handling pain because it diverts attention away from the problem, similar to stress management techniques, and includes the use of some common practices like guided imagery, meditation, or watching television, reading a book, or talking with a friend over the phone. Likewise, biofeedback is also helpful in identifying pain triggers through observing physiological responses to pain through the use of machines or computers and then teaching relaxation techniques in order to assist individual’s in gaining control of their physiological reactions to pain.

Although both psychological and physiological approaches to pain management procedures are helpful in their own ways, neither necessarily define the “best method” for handling pain—at least, not alone. Essentially, the primary problem in defining a standard method of pain management is the fact that the experience of pain is mostly subject. Although tests are available to measure specific fragments of pain, currently there is no exam available that can objectively measure pain with any amount of accuracy. Also, since both physiological and psychological factors influence the involvement of pain, it’s hard to distinguish which variables are positively or negatively altering elements of pain and individual levels of pain can change day-by-day. Given the number of factors involved, perhaps a better method for managing pain is to utilize a dual approach by combining both psychological and physiological techniques.

One way to combine both pain management strategies is through a technique known as self-management, which has been particularly supportive of individual’s living with chronic episodes of pain. Self-management programs are defined as “treatments for pain relief that make the patient with chronic pain the one with the most responsibility for making the change rather than the doctor or the health professional staff” (Gurung, 2014, p. 452). Self-management programs for chronic pain are effective because they focus on the emotional aspects of pain, outside of the physiological response, by teaching patients to change their thoughts or behaviors to better cope with their pain – mainly by focusing on various strategies to improve one’s overall quality of life. According to Gurung (2014), the main goals of self-management programs are to:

  1. Provide skill training to divert attention away from pain;
  2. Improve physical condition (via physical reconditioning);
  3. Increase daily physical activity;
  4. Provide ways to cope more effective with episodes of intense pain (without medication);
  5. Provide skills to manage depression, anger, and aggression; and
  6. Decrease tension, anxiety, stressful life demands, and interpersonal conflict. (p. 297).

Gender Bias of Pain:

It’s important to point out a very significant problem currently plaguing patients across the country — the gender bias in medicine. Although this problem is not exclusive in pain management, the gender bias in medicine is alarming because many women are often left without the proper care essential in maintaining a good quality of life.

It’s become far too common that women’s complaints of pain or illness are minimalized by the medical professionals they turn to for help, often implying that women are overly dramatic in their interpretations of pain. Doctors often label many of the pain symptoms found in women as being psychosomatic or “all in their head” when a diagnosis is not easily obtained. This bias becomes even more evident in women who have chronic pain, who continue being called a “drug-seeker” when asking for pain relief. “Women are more likely to have chronic pain conditions that are more difficult to diagnose and treat (TMJ Disorder, fibromyalgia), and in many cases, these are treated as mental or hormonal rather than as a disease or disorder” (Stacey, 2012). Likewise, many doctors still foster the ideology of the gender bias by suggesting that women are affected by pain harder than men.

According to Gurung (2014), “women reported significantly higher pain in most categories with the most significant differences in patients of the musculoskeletal, circulatory, respiratory and digestive systems, followed by infectious diseases, and injury and poisoning” and “men report less pain, cope better with pain, and respond to treatment for pain differently than women” (p. 274) However, at least in their initial presentation, these statements are somewhat misleading. At best, research is relatively and widely varied. Recently, an article I came across by Dusenbery (2015) called Is Medicine’s Gender Bias Killing Young Women? described this phenomenon in detail:

This pervasive bias may simply be easier to see in the especially high-stakes context of a heart attack, in which the true cause usually becomes crystal clear—too often tragically—in a matter of hours or days. When it comes to less acute problems, the effect of such medical gaslighting is harder to quantify, as many women either accept misdiagnoses or persist until they find a health care provider who believes their symptoms aren’t just in their head. But it can be observed indirectly: In the ever-increasing numbers of women prescribed anti-anxiety meds and anti-depressants. In the fact that women make up the majority of the 100 million Americans suffering from (often under-treated) chronic pain. In the fact that it takes nearly five years and five doctors, on average, for patients with autoimmune diseases, more than 75 percent of whom are women, to receive a proper diagnosis, and that half report being labeled “chronic complainers” in the early stages of their illness. Then there are the diseases, like chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia, that exist so squarely at the overlap of the Venn diagrams of “affects mostly women” and “unknown etiology” that they’ve only recently begun to be recognized as “real” diseases at all.  (para. 20)

There are some valid explanations for why pain across gender is inconsistent. In a study by Hamberg, Risberg, Johansson, & Westman (2004), for instance, it was found that “proposals of nonspecific somatic diagnoses, psychosocial questions, drug prescriptions, and the expressed need of diagnostic support from a physiotherapist and an orthopedist were more common with females” (para. 3). However, laboratory tests, physical examinations, diagnostic testing, and pain management were offered to men more often than it was for women patients. Additionally, the differences offered in treatment could result in the many inconsistencies demonstrated throughout the literature as to how men and women are different when it comes to pain. Furthermore, the gender difference may be the direct result of our modern culture expect men and women to experience pain. We often encourage women to express their feelings about pain, yet make them feel like they are crazy or are behaving like a hypochondriac in following the expectation. Alternately, society tells men to hide their emotions. So of course, it’s easy for “science” to say that women have more reported pain than men because females are more likely to confess about their experiences of pain, skewing the results and furthering the gender bias. At the end of the day, I do believe that Dusenbery (2015) stated it best by saying, “call me crazy—hysterical, even—but I don’t think you should have to feel that empowered just to receive proper medical treatment” (para. 20).

 

References

Dusenbery, M. (2015). Is Medicine’s Gender Bias Killing Young Women? Retrieved on Feb 16, 2016 from http://www.psmag.com/health-and-behavior/is-medicines-gender-bias-killing-young-women.

Gurung, R. A. (2014). Health Psychology: A Cultural Approach (3rd ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Hamberg, K., Risberg, G., Johansson, E.E., & Westman, G. (2004).  Gender bias in physician’s management of neck pain. Journal of Women’s Health & Gender-Based Medicine, 11(7): 653-666. doi:10.1089/152460902760360595.

Stacey (2012). Is There Gender Bias in Pain Management? Retrieved on February 16, 2016 from http://www.tmjhope.org/gender-bias-pain-management/

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